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Jessica Lewis

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 24 total)
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  • in reply to: Scoring of PCS #474176

    Jessica Lewis
    Participant

    Hi Lindsay!

    Sorry for the later than usual response. We don’t check the board as often in the “off season.”

    The ABPTS website gives the following explanation about scoring (but I’m guessing you have already read this since you are specifically asking a question about a score of 500).

    Reporting Examination Results
    NBME scores the specialist certification examinations, and candidates are issued a report that specifies their score, the passing score on the examination, and an analysis of performance according to the major competency areas tested. Although the score is based on the actual number of questions answered correctly, it is a scaled score. ABPTS requires a scaled score of 500 to pass the examination.
    -http://www.abpts.org/Certification/About/ExamScoring/

    Based on this explanation, I’m not sure that the score of 500 represents a specific percentage. It seems like it could change each year depending on the scaling of the scores. At least this is my understanding of how it works. If someone else has more information on this, please share!

  • in reply to: PCS Exam 2 Question – Hip Surveillance #472877

    Jessica Lewis
    Participant

    Hi Jonathan!

    Ideally, if the child was diagnosed early on with CP, he would have started hip surveillance every 6 months until the age of 2 years and then once a year after that. Since he is older and has not yet received hip x-rays, it is recommended that he now get x-rays completed every 6 months for 24 months to get a baseline and then once a year after that. So, in this case, the 24 month period starts now at the age of 4 years and then after 24 months (at the age of 6 years) he will start getting x-rays one time per month.

    Here is a link to a nice visual depiction of this schedule: https://www.aacpdm.org/UserFiles/file/hip-surveillance-care-pathway.pdf

  • in reply to: PCS case study exam question 29 #470705

    Jessica Lewis
    Participant

    A lot of the info I have for therapy after SDR comes from an AACPDM presentation by Caroline Colvin and Molly Thomas in 2018. It’s title is “An Evidence-Based Review of Physical Therapy Intervention for Individuals Who Have Undergone a Selective Dorsal Rhizotomy” found here: https://www.aacpdm.org/UserFiles/file/handouts/am18/bsh/BRK4-An-Evidence-based-Review-of-Physical-Therapy-.pdf

    Here is another article that I think is helpful that isn’t listed in their powerpoint presentation:
    Effect of selective dorsal rhizotomy in the treatment of children with cerebral palsy – Engsberg et al 2006

    I think the downfall of a lot of the literature is that it never specifies what “intensive” therapy is. It only vaguely references it and never fully defines it. I think what we can gather from some of the literature coming out about dosing and PT, intensive would be at least 3-5 times per week or longer sessions less times per week.

    At my hospital our guidelines are that the child will participate in therapy for 24-36 months after their SDR. 4-5x/week for 6 months post SDR, 2-3x/week from 6-12 months post SDR, and 1-2x/week 12-36 months post SDR. A lot of our patients also receive inpatient rehab immediately after the surgery for 2-3 weeks. Of course (unfortunately) insurance ultimately dictates if our children can actually do all of this.

  • in reply to: PCS case study exam question 1 #470700

    Jessica Lewis
    Participant

    Hello Sarah!

    In this scenario, at one month corrected age the child score in the low average range on the TIMP. Since the infant is not showing any major delays, supporting the family with a home program on areas that the child might be needing more help in would be best in this scenario. In the clinic, if there are any other more concerning signs (ex. asymmetries, abnormal GMA score, etc.), more frequent therapy would definitely warrant increased frequency and a more urgent need for therapy. In this case, no other signs/symptoms were noted in the question, so HEP with scheduled follow-up would be the best plan.

    In the case of the TIMP, it is still a good measure to determine if delays are present at any age. It is just most predictive of future motor delays at approximately 3 months corrected age.

  • in reply to: PEDI CAT #470491

    Jessica Lewis
    Participant

    The PEDI-CAT is both discriminative and evaluative. The normative standard score (provided as age percentiles and T scores) is discriminative. The scaled score is evaluative over time. However there is currently limited research at this time to interpret changes in scaled scores over time for the PEDI-CAT (vs the data we have available for the PEDI).

  • in reply to: dsp #470351

    Jessica Lewis
    Participant

    I was fortunate to have just completed a residency and that helped build those skills. The APTA also has a good resources about ethics and professionalism – https://www.apta.org/your-practice/ethics-and-professionalism
    If you’re an APTA member, they have additional resources including a monthly publication about ethics and professionalism.
    The APTA learning center also has a series of professionalism modules you can complete.

  • in reply to: PCS practice exam scores #470347

    Jessica Lewis
    Participant

    Update: Chrissy is going to work on getting this data and post average score later today.

  • in reply to: dsp #470345

    Jessica Lewis
    Participant

    I think the information listed in the DSP is pretty comprehensive and covers everything you will need to know. ABPTS states that there will not be any information on the test outside of what is listed in the DSP. There are some more difficult areas to really be able to study for and areas that we had more difficult generating questions about – for example workplace leadership and professional behaviors. Even though this is a small part of the test, those questions still haunt me because they were questions that are very difficult to know how to study for and I think is just something that you have to work out in your head pulling on your past leadership and professional behavior experiences.

    DSP outline (if you haven’t already found this): http://www.abpts.org/Resources/ExamOutlines/Pediatrics/

  • in reply to: PCS practice exam scores #470332

    Jessica Lewis
    Participant

    Hi Sarah!

    This is a great question but I do not have that data. I can check with Chrissy (the RKA founder) to see if she can pull that data. I can look into that over the next week and if it is available, I can let you know! We do know that last year we had a 96% pass rate for the exam. This is higher than the overall national average for the exam so we are confident that our materials do give you a boost when you are finally sitting to take the exam.

  • in reply to: Last few weeks #470330

    Jessica Lewis
    Participant

    I would focus on the areas that you are less confident in. For example, if you practice in outpatient developmental pediatrics and 90% of your caseload is CP, that is your strength. You might want to put more effort in reviewing areas that you are less familiar with – cardiopulmonary, inpatient lab values, etc. I think our study guides are a nice overview of many of the texts and articles you might have already reviewed. Use them and questions you are consistently missing on practice exams to determine what your weaknesses are and then really focus on those areas when you are studying.

  • in reply to: test taking strategies #470327

    Jessica Lewis
    Participant

    I would always go with your gut. You can typically eliminate one answer immediately, a second answer with a little bit of thought, and then finally trust your gut on the final two you have left. Flag questions that you aren’t sure about, but beware that you might not have the time to get back to those questions, so always at least make you best guess before moving on.

    In addition, don’t get stuck over analyzing the question. Read it for what it is and don’t second guess the intent behind the question.

  • in reply to: Biggest bang #470324

    Jessica Lewis
    Participant

    I focused a lot on the outpatient developmental aspect of pediatric practice. I could have put some more focus on the other areas of pediatric practice that I was less familiar with – inpatient/acute, sports, etc. Maybe put some more effort into areas that you have not yet practiced in since that might be a little more rusty.

  • in reply to: Testing specifics for the PCS. #470321

    Jessica Lewis
    Participant

    We know nothing more than what is on the ABPTS website about exam question specifics as we have no association with ABPTS. Our content is aligned with the percentages of different content areas stated in the DPS. The best information about test questions I can point you to is here: http://www.abpts.org/Resources/ExamOutlines/Pediatrics/

  • in reply to: research articles #470313

    Jessica Lewis
    Participant

    Hi Ashley!

    In terms of how test questions are typically written, they should not be creating questions about specific research studies and the results. They will stick to overall themes and ideas.

    I would prioritize systematic reviews and articles that have high applicability to clinical practice – such as the CP motor curves or Novak’s stop light review. These are summarizing important bodies of literature so they are able to get more information to you in just one article than all of the articles they are summarizing.

  • in reply to: #64 case based exam #332358

    Jessica Lewis
    Participant

    For an L4, possible muscle function includes: medial knee flexors (3/5) and ankle dorsiflexors (3/5) as well as all levels from L3 (knee extensors 3/5) and L2 (hip adductors 3/5, hip flexors 3/5), L1 (lower trunk, hip flexors 2/5), and above. For an L5 lesion, possible muscle function includes: hip abductors (2/5), lateral knee flexors (3/5), ankle invertors (3/5), toe extensors (palpable at ankle). L5 clues in this patient are the hip abductors, foot inversion, and toe extension. We would expect stronger muscle groups if the child was S1-3 as well as hip extension and ankle plantarflexion present to some extent.

    Here is a resource I find helpful: https://depts.washington.edu/dbpeds/HOW%20SB%20LESIONS%20IMPACT%20DAILY%20FUNCTION.pdf

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 24 total)